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Penruddock Signal Box

British signalling of the past (UK, excepting Northern Ireland)

Penruddock Signal Box

Unread postby guard_jamie » Sun Nov 5, 2017 10:07 pm

I am currently doing some research into the career of my Great Great Uncle, Sid Ridley who started on the railway at Penruddock in 1919, worked at various locations as Porter before returning there and becoming a signalman. I believe he remained in the role until the box closed in 1967, and he appears in a video called ‘Trains to Keswick’ visiting the ruined box.

Beyond that and the information on the signalbox.org website, I am struggling to find very much information on the box. I’d be very interested to know the layout of it before rationalisation and any photos anybody has of it when in service, interior or exterior.

It had a Tweedy frame - does anyone know if such a frame survives elsewhere?

Thanks in advance!
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Re: Penruddock Signal Box

Unread postby Sharpey » Sun Nov 5, 2017 11:55 pm

The 16 lever Tweedy frame from Troutbeck survives in the NRM's collection, albeit currently in a dismantled state and in storeage. The NRM accession number for it is 2002-8485.
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Re: Penruddock Signal Box

Unread postby John Hinson » Thu Nov 9, 2017 9:07 am

Three photographs of Penruddock for you:

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Photo: Dr J W F Scrimgeour 24/8/63, collection of John Hinson
View towards Penrith


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Photo: Dr J W F Scrimgeour 24/8/63, collection of John Hinson
Interior view of box - note the distinct holes in the quadrants for lever removal. The cast oval description plates are the original Tweedy type.


Image
Photo: Dr J W F Scrimgeour 24/8/63, collection of John Hinson
The signalling instruments were in the station office. The double-line section was originally controlled by Tyer's One-Wire, Two-Position blocks but the LMS modernised it with Tyer's One-Wire, Three-Position Non-Sequential instruments which may have been surplus from the many box closures on the Maryport & Carlisle in the 1930s.

I have posted a diagram for you at:
https://signalbox.org/diagrams.php?id=1178

I was intrigued to learn that Troutbeck's frame has survived. At the time it vanished, Troutbeck had been reduced to rubble and it was rumoured that diddycoys had demolished it for the scrap metal. Other later survivors were Threlkeld (demolished for housing development that doesn't seem to have ever happened) and of course Penruddock (which vanished with the building of the new A66).

Tweedy was a small firm in Carlisle and I think the CK&P was the only railway they supplied their standard tappet frame to. They has previously made non-tappet frames for other companies in close range of Carlisle, and also made some Stevens-style dwarf frames for the North British which were only found in the Scottish lowlands. Tweedy was taken over by Tyer & Co in the 1900s, who until then had no frame-manufacturing ability, and the Carlisle factory continued in use for that purpose.

Best regards,

John
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