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Swedish semaphore arms - Anglo-german crossover

Signalling outside the UK (but including Northern Ireland), past, present and future

Re: Swedish semaphore arms - Anglo-german crossover

Unread postby PDR » Fri Aug 14, 2015 6:05 am

MRFS -

As I understand it, Telegraph/Telephone Block is control of the line between stations using telegraph, later telephone rather than block telegraph, or lock and block. In the case of a single line there was a precise procedure for offering and accepting trains, with everything being recorded in the block register - hence its alternative name 'Paper Block.' The dialogue would go something like:

A would phone B and say: 'Train Message. Do you accept Train 1234?'
If the line is clear B replies: 'Train 1234 - yes.'
This is repeated by Operator A and Operator B confirms that he has repeated the message correctly. The same sort of statement-repetition-confirmation process is repeated when the train leaves A, and when it reaches B, so that the two station operators are completely clear what is where. The Somerset and Dorset Joint did something similar using block instruments, but with their traffic summer density and sloppy operating practices they ended up having a rather spectacular head-on prang c.1876, which kind of put the first nail in that particular coffin in the UK.

On double lines the offering and acceptance of trains was omitted, but the train entering block, and leaving block messages were still transmitted, and the register kept. Of course, the safety of the whole system ultimately lay in the timetable which was 'the Law and the Prophets' so far as Paper/Telegraph Block was concerned.

I hope I am not doing too much violence to the concept. Please feel free to leap in.

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Re: Swedish semaphore arms - Anglo-german crossover

Unread postby Frank » Fri Aug 14, 2015 3:48 pm

Hello,


ohh that:
One obvious different in Sweden is that some main signals had three arms indicating fast, medium, and low speeds through complex track layouts


was common in Germany too until second WW.

Also that:
A would phone B and say: 'Train Message. Do you accept Train 1234?'
If the line is clear B replies: 'Train 1234 - yes.'


First on the Morse and later on the Phone and it still is in the Rule Book for Handling Trains in Failure of technical equipment.

The Zugmeldeverfahren (Train announcing) was here common on Single branch lines until the turn in the 21 Century.
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Re: Swedish semaphore arms - Anglo-german crossover

Unread postby PDR » Fri Aug 14, 2015 7:13 pm

Looks like we have pretty much nailed down the case for Sweden gradually moving from UK to German practice, then. ;)

I have to admit that pre-1945 German practice is not something I know a lot about other than it was the period when DR standardized things. Before 1914, beyond being dimly aware that Bavaria did its own thing in many areas, I know just enough to get into trouble, a situation not helped by the fact that I tend to be more interested in narrow gauge railways and rural branches than mainlines.

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Re: Swedish semaphore arms - Anglo-german crossover

Unread postby michiel » Thu Oct 8, 2015 5:36 pm

I happen to be acquainted with one of the volunteers of the "Lennakatten" (Uppsala Länna Järnväg) who is dutch, and I have visited the line three times. Due to the line being a public carrier, there are minimum standards for signalling in force. Marielund and Uppsala Östra have colour light signalling and motor worked points. Marielund has a 8 lever Ericsson-licensed VES electromechanical frame in the station building. Uppsala Östra has an all-electric Ericsson installation with pushbutton control for all signals and points. Länna and Almunge stations have an all electric platform switchbox which is normally switched out.

At Bärby station is a double-armed swedish semaphore of the more modern type with operating cranks on the signal mast. It is normally in the 'obevakad' (switched out) position with both arms at clear. I have never seen it operated. Block working is by telephone block. The end station of Faringe is unsignalled, access to the station yard is by unlocking a derail point which lies normally open in the up direction.
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